Quinoa – why all the hype?

Recently the superfood quinoa has received a lot of attention, so I decided to look into the benefits of quinoa and try it myself.

What is quinoa?

Quinoa, though popularly thought of as a grain or legume, is actually a seed. There are two varieties – red and white, which I will compare later. Quinoa comes from the goosefoot plant, which is native to South America where it has been used by the Incas in the Andes for centuries. To the Incas, quinoa is known as the “mother grain” and is treated as sacred.

http://www.vegparadise.com/highestperch36.html has a very extensive description of the history of quinoa.

What are the benefits of eating quinoa?

I’ve summarized the benefits of quinoa in this chart:

Quina benefits3b

All these nutritional benefits can lead to the following observable health benefits:

  • Better sleep – due to the presence of the amino acid tryptophan which in large amounts can cause sleepiness. Be aware, however, that although many claim quinoa provides better sleep there is no scientific evidence to support this.
  • Prevention of atherosclerosis – the low fat, high fibre content of quinoa lowers LDL blood cholesterol and raises HDL cholesterol.
  • Prevention of cancer – high fibre diets have been shown to reduce the incidence of bowel and other cancers.
  • Balanced blood sugar – the high fibre content of quinoa buffers blood sugar spikes, leading to reduced insulin resistance and incidence of Type II diabetes.

Is red or white quinoa best?

While red quinoa contains marginally less fat and slightly more fibre than white quinoa, they are both very low-fat, high-fibre foods. Also, though both are equally good sources of protein, white quinoa contains approximately double the amount of iron found in red quinoa. Therefore white quinoa appears to be slightly more nutritious than red quinoa, but not by much so it probably doesn’t matter which you choose to eat. You can decide based on personal preference and availability. A mix of the two can make dishes look more colourful and appetizing too!

How do I incorporate quinoa into my diet?

Quinoa makes an excellent substitute for other grains, due to its fluffy, slightly crunchy texture and subtle “grainy” or nutty flavour. It can easily be incorporated into all sorts of meals, and not just lunches and dinners either:

  • Breakfast: cook with unsweetened milk substitutes such as almond milk to make a healthy porridge. You can also toast quinoa after it has been boiled as an alternative to toasted muesli or granola.
  • Snacks: incorporate into cookies and breads, snack bars or muffins.
  • Salads: Cooked quinoa can be added to salads to bulk them up, or you could sprout quinoa before adding it to salads. Sprouted quinoa has a higher protein content than boiled quinoa.
  • Rice dishes: the flavour and texture of quinoa makes it an excellent substitute for rice.
  • Soups: add to soups to increase the protein and fibre content.
  • Desserts: Quinoa can be added to cookies and muffins, used to create parfait or as a substitute for rice in rice pudding.

The possibilites are endless. There are many great sources for quinoa recipes on the web. Once you start cooking with it you’ll find uses everywhere!

How do I cook quinoa?

Quinoa is naturally coated with saponins, a bitter and soapy residue which naturally protects the seeds from birds and insects while growing, so make sure you rinse it thoroughly before cooking.

Use 2 parts water to 1 part quinoa.

Bring to the boil then reduce heat and simmer for 12-15 minutes until the husks snap open and the quinoa becomes translucent.

Quinoa can be cooked with spices for added flavour, or can also be cooked with unsweetened milk substitutes like almond milk for a healthy porridge.

Quinoa for raw-food diets

Although quinoa is mostly used cooked, it can be incorporated into raw-food diet as well to ensure you are receiving a complete source of protein.

IMG_4845

Sprouted quinoa
Source: http://therawproject.com/?p=2770

Quinoa can be sprouted by the following method:

Use a jar, a piece of straining mesh and a sealing ring to fit the jar.

  • Fill the jar with quinoa to 1/3, then top up the rest of the jar with water.
  • Fit the wire mesh over the top of the jar and secure with the sealing ring.
  • Strain the quinoa and then rinse 2-3 times.
  • Fill the jar with water and soak the quinoa for about 6 hours.
  • Rinse, strain and then leave the jar inverted so that excess water can continue to drain off.
  • Rinse the quinoa at least once every 8 hours.
  • The quinoa will begin to sprout within 24 hours. Sprouting is best halted between 24-30 hours, but may be left for up to 48 hours. Apparently the sprouts begin to develop a bitter lemony taste after about 30 hours.

Refridgerate and serve over salads, or use them to make veggie burgers.

Use sprouted quinoa as soon as possible after sprouting.

Potential harmful effects of quinoa:

Quinoa is generally considered quite safe and a very healthy food, but here are just a few things to consider when using quinoa:

  • Pathogens on sprouted quinoa – as with all sprouts there is the potential for contamination with harmful bacteria or mold, so be thorough with your rinsing during the production of the sprouts, store in the refridgerator after sprouting and use as soon as possible (in a couple of days). There are anti-bacterial solutions available to rinse the seeds or sprouts during the sprouting process but be extra careful to rinse all traces of these solutions off the sprouts before eating.
  • Saponins – raw quinoa is naturally coated with saponins which protect the seeds from birds and insects. Saponins are toxic when consumed, so be sure to always thoroughly rinse quinoa before cooking it to remove this residue.
  • Stomach aches – if you consume too much quinoa you may experience stomach pain, gas or discomfort due to the high fibre content, particularly if you are not used consuming much fibre. Introduce quinoa to your diet slowly and drink plenty of water. Reduce the amount you are consuming if you experience any pain or discomfort.

Other blogs and websites with good information:

http://www.poweroffood.com/how-to-sprout-quinoa-with-ease/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/512356-what-are-benefits-and-nutritional-value-of-quinoa/ (and other quinoa-related articles on their website)

http://www.instructables.com/id/Sprout-Quinoa/#step1

http://bodyecology.com/articles/quinoa_benefits_guide.php#

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-4994/7-Benefits-of-Quinoa-The-Supergrain-of-the-Future.html

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5 Responses to Quinoa – why all the hype?

  1. yum! love quinoa, i have some on the stove at the moment! as a vegetarian its great – it’s the only plant source with a complete source of protein, as you mentioned 🙂

  2. lissa0269 says:

    Thanks for the post! I’ve been contemplating adding quinoa into my diet as another protein source! This was very informative and just what I needed to give me the push to go buy some. Going to buy bulk so I can get enough to try before committing to a larger amount! –ifnotfortheskinnyjeans.wordpress.com

  3. Anonymous says:

    Cosco has precooked. Ready to eat. Love it

  4. tiff123 says:

    I always get a lot of stomach discomfort after eating quinoa, but now I realize that it’s probably because I eat about half a plate full of it with some salmon! I big gulps of water after getting the stomach discomfort and it really helped. Thank you for the tip! It probably was because of the overload of fiber intake!

  5. Laura (So Ca) says:

    We cook up a sauce pan of cooked Quinoa Cereal and add Pumpkin Spice as the spice of choice, for a warm breakfast. Since I have food allergies and Diverticulitis, my food choices are few, and Quinoa helps my intestines behave. Even during an acute attack, Quinoa cooked is OK. We are hooked. If I do have any adverse momentary issues, I suck a Ginger Chew (Ginger People) and it settles down. Quinoa has been a cost effective source of protein, and unlike animal protein, I’m not scared of antibiotics, hormones, or steroids.

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